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  #1  
Old 09-26-2011, 03:46 PM
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Default Succulent's shelter for winter

Dear all,

Please find attached a picture of the shelter I made. The goal is to stop winter precipitations. Here in south east of France the climate is mediterranean. Winters are wet and some cold (with mild to hard frost) events may happen.

I plant under the PVC roof Ferocactus gracilis colorata, Ferocactus pilosus, Opuntia minuta, Hechtia caerulea and Hechtia podantha. All plants thrive several winters in my unheated greenhouse with minus 5 celcius.

Does somebody work with similar winter protection? What result did you obtain?

Sincerely.

Jean-Michel
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  #2  
Old 09-27-2011, 03:59 PM
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Default Rain Angle

Jean - Well constructed. One thing I noticed though is that your area of coverage does not account for wind driven rain. Rain rarely falls vertically and usually, due to wind, falls diagonally. A good rule of thumb is that at 48 km/h, rain will fall at a 45 degree angle, or as my architect tells me, for every 1 mph (1.6 km/h) the rain shifts to the diagonal by 1.5 degrees from perpendicular. So, you may still see a lot of rain getting onto the plants. The taller the structure, the greater the chance.
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Old 09-28-2011, 12:43 PM
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Jean-Michel,

I had a similar structure in San Diego, but it was attached to a high fence, effectively giving me a wall.

As noted by the other poster, I would put up an additional wall, on the side the prevailing wind comes from. You'll still get air circulation but you won't have the rains coming in and onto your plants.

That's a great start, though. You'll find many plants are opportunistic (even in the winter) when left outside but protected.
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:24 PM
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Thank you for your advice. You are right. I project to add two size with PVC and the other two with a horticultural net (to "break" rain drops).

What kind of plants are you protecting in San Diego? I am thinking your climate in south CA is just perfect!

Regards!

Jean-Michel
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Old 09-28-2011, 02:52 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean-Michel DUPUYOO View Post

What kind of plants are you protecting in San Diego? I am thinking your climate in south CA is just perfect!

Regards!

Jean-Michel
Jean-Michel,

I used to live there. When I did, I had a number of Pachypodiums and some other plants which did not want watering when we got our winter rains. Perhaps if I had a greenhouse they would have never gone dormant. However, since they did lose their leaves for the winter, I had to keep them dry.

However, for the most part, you are absolutely correct - for most succulent plants, it's hard to improve on San Diego's weather.
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Old 09-28-2011, 03:04 PM
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Tomorow I am taking pictures of my second succulent's shelter (Does this term is correct?).

The goal is to grown several species of globular cacti.

I also plan to build a third shelter. I would like to grow below it Myrtillocactus geom. and Cereus monstruosus. How tall should this shelter be? Does 2,5 meters tall is correct?

Do you think I can also grown Neobuxmania polylopha? I know this specie can be very tall but maybe 2,5 meters is OK to grown such plant for 10 years...

If you have ideas about others species of columnar cacti they are welcome.

All the best.

Jean-Michel
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Old 09-28-2011, 05:31 PM
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Jean-Michel,

Plant shelter - yes, that's correct.

I think that's tall enough.

Some other suggestions are Pilosocereus, Armatocereus and Browningia. Perhaps if you look at what the botanical garden in Monaco (the Marnier family garden) grows you might get some ideas.

Cheers,

Jeff
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Old 09-29-2011, 01:48 PM
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Thank you for your recomendations. Unfortunately the climate at Monaco is very different even I am just 100 km far from it. Monaco enjoy a very special micro-climate. The garden is located at 100/150 meter above sea, south facing, on the rock cliff just in face of the sea...

Does Pilosocereus windstand negative temperature (below 0C) in dry location?
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Old 09-29-2011, 04:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jean-Michel DUPUYOO View Post
Tomorow I am taking pictures of my second succulent's shelter (Does this term is correct?).

The goal is to grown several species of globular cacti.

I also plan to build a third shelter. I would like to grow below it Myrtillocactus geom. and Cereus monstruosus. How tall should this shelter be? Does 2,5 meters tall is correct?

Do you think I can also grown Neobuxmania polylopha? I know this specie can be very tall but maybe 2,5 meters is OK to grown such plant for 10 years...

If you have ideas about others species of columnar cacti they are welcome.

All the best.

Jean-Michel
If the shelter does is not too wide, then I would keep it a short as possible as a rain shelter. If you are worried about height, you can put pipe in the ground and insert the legs into the pipe. Then if you want to remove later, it is pretty easy. Need to make sure it won't blow away though. Also, you can always add extensions to the pipe to raise the shelter up if you need it to be taller. The shorter the shelter, the less the rain will get in.
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Old 09-30-2011, 07:24 AM
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Yes I plan to fence the shelter with PVC or nets to stop the rain but keep good air mouvement inside.

Does peoples in north California (and others frosty area) use this king of protection?

I also plan to create next year a shelter with a heater system as I can keep the air above frizing temperature (+4/5C). Does some members tryed this kind of winter protection?

Sincerely.

Jean-Michel
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:30 AM
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I was searching the forum for threads on winter protection strategies. This thread (a year down the road) and Jean Michel's structure pictures and comments are very helpful but I am not very able at construction so looking for some simple/inexpensive solutions to precipitation and cold that someone of limited strength and funds can accomplish. I have done ok with just putting a sheet of plastic over my collection using various items to tent it off the plants, and weights to keep it from blowing away but wanted to try to see if I can improve a little. I've seen others using large bubble plastic- I've used small sections on single plants but I saw others use it in larger scale and wondered if there is a good resource for this. In my dreams I will eventually install some kind of lean-to type shelter for the SW elevation of our garage but we have so many other home-maintenance priorities I don't know if/when it might happen. I'm in a 9a-b area in Northern California wine country so like Jean-Michel it's the rain and some frosts (Mediterranean) and a rare snow/hail event with which I need to contend.
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Old 10-17-2012, 01:37 AM
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Sorry for the self-reply to what I now find was probably a redundant post--I believe I found a thread with some more info here
http://www.xericworld.com/forums/sho...ter+protection
Don't know why I didn't find it in my previous search ... anyway if you read this and think you have some other (or specific to me) suggestions to impart please do!
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Old 10-17-2012, 05:51 AM
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Dear all,

So far my shelters protect well the cacti. But no temperature gain during winter has been recorded. It is just to keep the plants and the roots dry.

About your problem in California you should visit Ruth Bancroft Botanical Garden. I contacted last year the curator who very kindly give my informations and advices. It is possible to see on google images pictures of the protections used each winter in this californian garden (close SF).

Keep me inform about your future experience.

All the best.

JM Dupuyoo
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Old 10-18-2012, 12:22 PM
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not sure what you wintertime temperatures are there, but all those plants grow here in southern California in our wet, cold winters and have not seen too many, if any problems with any of these species during even long periods of wet, cold rains (weeks on end). May be doing more than needed there.
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Old 10-18-2012, 06:57 PM
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Jean-Michel, I hope to make it over to Ruth Bancroft Botanical Garden sometime. I have never been. It only came onto my radar recently. (I really need to get out more).
Geoff, I'm not sure to whom your were replying but I've wondered in my case if I'm being overly concerned. Then again, an ounce of trouble for a pound of prevention or what ever the saying is. Keen to learn how others do it. I don't sweat most of my aloes. Never had any issues there. Altho I did include the young KG plants and young tree-aloes under the plastic last winter, not knowing how hardy they are. I just ordered some new aloe treasures I'll be coddling this year too.
The Copiapoas, Pachys, Euphorbs, Ariocarpus, and other geophytes are the ones I am most concerned about, plus some of the Notos, Gymnos and Sulcos... (I'll be doing some refreshing on varieties' hardiness soon). The fat and tenderest plants go into my studio Southern window. I've used the light painter's plastic (handy as I live with a painter) over my tables which is actually pretty sufficient (and cheap) for simply keeping plants dry.
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Old 10-18-2012, 11:01 PM
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The "wet, cold" winters of California are nothing compared to those of Europe. For survival in Europe, the drier the better, no question!

T
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Old 12-13-2015, 09:21 AM
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Some pictures of the shelters. It is a rainy day and I can assure it may be nicer with a nice sunshine.

Anyway the three shelters are finish. I have to plant few more cactus.

Remember the shelters are located in a zoological garden. So plants are more adapted to general interested people with big Echinocactus grusonii.





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Last edited by Jean-Michel DUPUYOO; 12-13-2015 at 09:39 AM. Reason: pictures
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Old 12-13-2015, 10:02 AM
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Sorry seem the pictures cannot be download from here. So you may have a look here :

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...8557341&type=3
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Old 12-17-2015, 02:40 PM
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I dont have Facebook so that doesnt work for me to see the photos either.

But,For the first time ever I'm trying to overwinter an Adenium arabicum outdoors under shelter from rains,light frosts. Its still in leaf,looks good. Taken down to 35f.

Even with no artificial heating at all...the number of tropicals or tender plants that can be grown go way up and more exotic if you keep cold rains off them.
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Old 12-18-2015, 09:28 AM
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Very nice setup you have. Hope it is a successful endeavor. Wish I could do that here, My winters are way to cold even keeping them dry.

Lost some cash in Monaco years ago and they do have a great garden. I think Nice, just a stones throw from Monaco is the most beautiful city on earth, Especially from the sea.

Bob
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Old 12-19-2015, 02:51 AM
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Thanks for that comment. Nice, in the south of France, is where I will be spending my Christmas. And the gardens and plants are also wonderful.
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Old 12-23-2015, 01:29 AM
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I have lost a number of plants to very occasional frost in Southern California. I live about five miles from the beach, and the temperature sometimes falls below freezing for a few nights. The frost sensitive plants must be kept above freezing or damage will occur and more damage if they are wet.
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